All Tech Considered All Tech Considered

In his new book, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella explores how he's had to work on his capacity for empathy to change the company's culture. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How Do You Turn Around A Tech Giant? With Empathy, Microsoft CEO Says

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Ellen Pao is a tech investor, co-founder of inclusion nonprofit Project Include, and former Reddit CEO. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Silicon Valley's Ellen Pao Tackles Sex Discrimination, Workplace Diversity In Memoir

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Nikol Szymul staffs a reception desk at Amazon offices in downtown Seattle. Online retail powerhouse Amazon is searching for a second headquarters location, which an official from Toronto has called "the Olympics of the corporate world." Glenn Chapman/Getty Images hide caption

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Glenn Chapman/Getty Images

Cities Try Convincing Amazon They're Ready For Its New Headquarters

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Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, announces features of the new iPhone X on Sept. 12 at the Steve Jobs Theater on the new Apple campus in Cupertino, Calif. The phone's new ability to unlock itself using a scan of its owner's face inspired a strong, divided reaction. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

iPhone X's Face ID Inspires Privacy Worries — But Convenience May Trump Them

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Wold Without Mind by Franklin Foer (Emily Bogle/NPR) Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

'World Without Mind': How Tech Companies Pose An Existential Threat

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A man uses his mobile phone near an Apple store logo in Beijing. The latest iPhone is expected to include facial recognition as an unlocking feature but do away with the home button. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

On iPhone's 10th Anniversary, Apple Has A Go At A Big Redesign

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Jessica Alter is a co-founder of Tech For Campaigns. The San Francisco-based startup focuses on state races and is currently working on campaigns in Virginia. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

Silicon Valley Wants To Dust Off The Democratic Establishment

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These days, a radiologist at UCSF will go through anywhere from 20 to 100 scans a day, and each scan can have thousands of images to review. xijian/iStockphoto hide caption

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xijian/iStockphoto

Scanning The Future, Radiologists See Their Jobs At Risk

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Democratic congressional candidate Regina Bateson (left) speaks with local resident Paige Stauss outside a public library in Granite Bay, Calif., following a campaign event. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

Thinking Of Running For Office? A Website Lets You Test The Waters

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People make their way out of a flooded neighborhood in Houston on Monday. Many people are turning to social media for help. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Facebook, Twitter Replace 911 Calls For Stranded In Houston

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White nationalist Richard Spencer's free speech fight against Google, Facebook and other tech companies has some unlikely support from the left. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Unlikely Allies Join Fight To Protect Free Speech On The Internet

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People in the U.S. who want to keep their activity hidden are turning to virtual private networks — but VPNs are often insecure. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Turning To VPNs For Online Privacy? You Might Be Putting Your Data At Risk

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Kyle Quinn, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Arkansas, was wrongly identified on social media as a participant in a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va. Jennifer Mortensen hide caption

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Jennifer Mortensen

Kyle Quinn Hid At A Friend's House After Being Misidentified On Twitter As A Racist

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David Brown of Plymouth, Mass., sends a message during a protest Sunday, held in response to a white nationalist rally that spiraled into deadly violence in Charlottesville, Va., the day before. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Some Are Troubled By Online Shaming Of Charlottesville Rally Participants

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The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently revised its guidelines on creating passwords. eclipse_images/iStockPhoto hide caption

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eclipse_images/iStockPhoto

Forget Tough Passwords: New Guidelines Make It Simple

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Gierad Laput, a Ph.D. student at Carnegie Mellon University, demonstrates how his team's universal sensor picks up the sound from a hand-held vacuum. Liz Reid/WESA hide caption

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Liz Reid/WESA

Our Homes May Get Smarter, But Have We Thought It Through?

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Worshipers at the Walloon Reformed Church of St. Augustine in Magdeburg, Germany, participate in a service where the congregation is encouraged to tweet about the liturgy and share their prayers online. Esme Nicholson/NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson/NPR

In Germany, Churchgoers Are Encouraged To Tweet From The Pews

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Harvey Mudd College students Ellen Seidel and Christine Chen work on a summer research project in computer science. Harvey Mudd College hide caption

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Harvey Mudd College

Colleges Have Increased Women Computer Science Majors: What Can Google Learn?

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Danielle Brown speaks during TechCrunch Disrupt NY 2016. She is Google's new chief diversity officer, a position she previously held at Intel. Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch

Is The Memo Controversy A Pivot Point On Diversity For Google?

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