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David Giovannoni uses a reproduction of Scott's phonautograph. Giovannoni is part of the team that recovered the audio from Scott's recordings. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

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Art Silverman/NPR

At The Dawn Of Recorded Sound, No One Cared

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John Goodenough's work led to the lithium-ion battery, now found in everything from phones to electric cars. He and fellow researchers at the University of Texas, Austin say they've come up with a faster-charging alternative. Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT

At 94, Lithium-Ion Pioneer Eyes A New Longer-Lasting Battery

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The Gab.ai home page cites the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Gab.ai/Screenshot by NPR

Feeling Sidelined By Mainstream Social Media, Far-Right Users Jump To Gab

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Dan Howley tries out the Google Daydream View virtual-reality headset and controller on Oct. 4, 2016, following a product event in San Francisco. This week, Google announced plans for stand-alone VR goggles that won't need to be attached to a PC or smartphone. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

In this photo dated Aug. 23, 2010, Iranian technicians work at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, where Iran had confirmed several personal laptops infected by Stuxnet malware. Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency hide caption

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Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency

A screenshot of the warning screen from a purported ransomware attack on a laptop in Beijing. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

From Kill Switch To Bitcoin, 'WannaCry' Showing Signs Of Amateur Flaws

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Microsoft President Brad Smith speaks at the annual Microsoft shareholders meeting on Nov. 30, 2016, in Bellevue, Wash. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Microsoft President Urges Nuclear-Like Limits On Cyberweapons

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Andrew Knight holds a sign of Pepe the frog, an alt-right icon, during a rally in Berkeley, Calif., on April 27. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

What Pepe The Frog's Death Can Teach Us About The Internet

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Walt Mossberg has been reporting on technology since the 1990s. He plans to retire in June. Mike Kepka/Courtesy of Walt Mossberg hide caption

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Mike Kepka/Courtesy of Walt Mossberg

After Decades Covering It, Tech Still Amazes Walt Mossberg

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Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has started the process to roll back Obama-era regulations for Internet service providers. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

FCC Chief Makes Case For Tackling Net Neutrality Violations 'After The Fact'

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Paulo Melo is a global entrepreneur-in-residence at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. This visa workaround allowed Melo, originally from Portugal, to legally stay in the United States and build his business in Massachusetts. Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/Asma Khalid/WBUR

Without A Special Visa, Foreign Startup Founders Turn To A Workaround

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Tom Hanks stars in The Circle as a tech CEO who is part Steve Jobs and part Mark Zuckerberg. Frank Masi/STX Entertainment hide caption

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Frank Masi/STX Entertainment

In 'The Circle', What We Give Up When We Share Ourselves

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A Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police officer wears a camera during a news conference in 2014. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Scientists Hunt Hard Evidence On How Cop Cameras Affect Behavior

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A driver uses a phone while behind the wheel of a car on April 30, 2016, in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

'Textalyzer' Aims To Curb Distracted Driving, But What About Privacy?

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"DoggoLingo" is a language trend that's been gaining steam on the Internet in the past few years. Words like doggo, pupper and blep most often accompany a picture or video of a dog and have spread on social media. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

A conference worker passes a demo booth at Facebook's annual F8 developer conference, on Tuesday in San Jose, Calif. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Murder Video Again Raises Questions About How Facebook Handles Content

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