Morris Kesler, chief technology officer at WiTricity, shows how a wireless charging pad can be installed on a table. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

A Future Of Gadgets Without Power Cords? Not So Fast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/538531750/538608518" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Artificial intelligence poses an existential risk to human civilization, Elon Musk (right) told the National Governors Association meeting Saturday in Providence, R.I. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Stephan Savoia/AP

Google CEO Sundar Pichai talks about the new Google Assistant during a 2016 product event in San Francisco. The voice assistant is one of a number of Google products that will provide user data to the curation service that the company is launching Wednesday. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP

With Entry Into Interest Curation, Google Goes Head-To-Head With Facebook

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537960537/538040065" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Museums only have so much wall space, which means the vast majority of their collections are sitting in storage. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has a creative solution to the problem — the museum is texting its artwork to anyone who asks. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Tight On Wall Space, SFMOMA Will Text Its Art To You Instead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537737939/538065364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After collecting and refurbishing IBM's Model F keyboards for years, Joe Strandberg decided he wanted to start manufacturing them. Courtesy of Joe Strandberg hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Joe Strandberg

This 10-Pound Keyboard From The 1980s Is Making A Comeback

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537290841/537291355" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Supasorn Suwajanakorn via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Computer Scientists Demonstrate The Potential For Faking Video

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537154304/537174852" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I lost the first good novel I ever wrote to a computer disaster. It happened at a crucial time in my life, when I was still figuring out if I could even do this thing — become a writer." Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images

A Novelist Forces Himself To Press On After Losing 100 Pages In A Tech Glitch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534865245/536682009" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Federal Communications Commission is accepting public comment on its proposal to loosen the "net neutrality" rules placed on Internet providers in 2015. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Internet Companies Plan Online Campaign To Keep Net Neutrality Rules

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535804285/537007226" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Some companies find that real-time technology demands have forced them to curb their work-from-home policies, even as a growing number of employers continue to embrace remote work. Dean Mitchell/Getty Images/iStock hide caption

toggle caption
Dean Mitchell/Getty Images/iStock

Some Employers Are Rethinking Telework, Citing A Need For Better Collaboration

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535398716/536595613" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"We should be around the world. But we should also be focused on our own backyards," Microsoft President Brad Smith says. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP

Microsoft Courts Rural America, And Politicians, With High-Speed Internet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/536559534/536595535" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Companies are trying geofencing, which uses GPS and radio frequency identification to set up a virtual, wireless perimeter so that cellphone users in that area receive messages or advertisements on their phones. Rawpixel/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Rawpixel/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Recruiters Use 'Geofencing' To Target Potential Hires Where They Live And Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535981386/536025849" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A prototype Moby Mart is being tested in Shanghai. Per Cromwell, the project's lead designer, says four to six additional mobile supermarkets are planned in the coming year. Moby Mart hide caption

toggle caption
Moby Mart

Passports and some credit cards have RFID chips that allow information to be read wirelessly. An industry has sprung up to make wallets and other products that block hackers from "skimming" the data. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

There Are Plenty Of RFID-Blocking Products, But Do You Need Them?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535518514/535530508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new urban district and an annual big-data expo have arisen in recent years as the centerpiece of the high-tech industry in Guiyang, capital of Guizhou province. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

A Remote Chinese Province Uses Its Climate To Grow A Big-Data Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/535369266/535408659" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A driver uses his smartphone to pay the highway toll with Alipay, an app of Alibaba's online payment service, in the Chinese city of Hangzhou. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
STR/AFP/Getty Images

In China, A Cashless Trend Is Taking Hold With Mobile Payments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534846403/534847631" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Charles Camiel looks into the camera for a facial recognition test before boarding his JetBlue flight to Aruba at Logan International Airport in Boston. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Facial Recognition May Boost Airport Security But Raises Privacy Worries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534131967/534448056" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Eighth graders Cristian Munoz (left) and Clifton Steward work on their Chromebooks during a language arts class at French Middle School in Topeka, Kan. Both students were eligible to bring the devices home this summer. Scott Ritter/Courtesy of French Middle School hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Ritter/Courtesy of French Middle School

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg (right) speaks with panelists at the Facebook Communities Summit on Thursday in Chicago, where he announced Facebook's mission will change to focus on the activity level of its users. From left are Lola Omolola, Erin Schatteman and Janet Sanchez, who run popular Facebook groups. Teresa Crawford/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Teresa Crawford/AP

A DIYgirls team from San Fernando Senior High School created a device that uses solar power to sanitize a tent using antibacterial UV lights. Courtesy of DIYGirls hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of DIYGirls

All-Girls Teen Engineering Team Creates A Solar-Powered Tent For Homeless People

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533909715/533909716" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Facebook has created new tools for trying to keep terrorist content off the site. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

How Facebook Uses Technology To Block Terrorist-Related Content

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533855547/533909778" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Uber co-founder Travis Kalanick, pictured here at a Vanity Fair summit in October 2016, resigned abruptly this week as the company's CEO after weeks of scandals about workplace culture. Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair

After CEO Resignation, Is Uber Kalanick-less Or Kalanick-free?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533791446/533849793" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript