Animals Animals

Martha (right), the last known passenger pigeon, died in 1914. Her preserved body is now on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

Why Did The Passenger Pigeon Go Extinct? The Answer Might Lie In Their Toes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564597936/564674970" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Beginning Surfer Escapes Jaw Of A 10-Foot Shark

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564006416/564006417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fish market workers in Jersey City, N.J., prepare a bluefin tuna for shipment to some of New York's top sushi restaurants. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

A waitress serving shark fin soup in a restaurant in Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province. Environmental and animal rights groups have campaigned for decades against consumption of shark fin, arguing that demand for the delicacy has decimated the world's shark population and that the methods used to obtain it are inhumane. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

A piglet gets a shot of antibiotic at a farm in Illinois. The World Health Organization is calling for strict limits on antibiotic use in animals raised for food. The guidelines could push many countries, including the U.S., to restrict drug use on farms. Stacey Wescott/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stacey Wescott/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

Hippo Gives Up On A Chance To See What's Outside Zoo's Gates

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/562270913/562270914" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From Fire Hydrants To Rescue Work, Dogs Perceive The World Through Smell

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561551389/561908743" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ken Rapopo throws a pigeon in the air during a practice flight. This male pigeon will fly about 2 miles back to the winner's circle to find its female partner. Rapopo reports the bird's movements by walkie-talkie until it disappears from view. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

The Pigeon Racers Of Indonesia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561560174/561952537" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Pacific walrus is facing "extinction from climate change" after the White House refused to list the species as endangered, one conservation group says. S.A. Sonsthagen/AP hide caption

toggle caption
S.A. Sonsthagen/AP

A Bird, A Beak And A 3-D Printer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/561505703/561505704" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Mexican long-tongued bat is one of the species that pollinates agave, but its ecosystem is being disrupted by large-scale, cheaper methods of making tequila. Merlin Tuttle/Bat Conservation International hide caption

toggle caption
Merlin Tuttle/Bat Conservation International

Bats And Tequila: A Once Boo-tiful Relationship Cursed By Growing Demands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/560292442/560660226" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Who Says You Can't Train A Cat? A Book Of Tips For Feline-Human Harmony

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/560387049/560434081" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dallas Seavey poses with his lead dogs Reef (left) and Tide after finishing the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska, in March 2016. Seavey denies he administered banned drugs to his dogs in this year's race and has withdrawn from the 2018 race in protest. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Thiessen/AP

Scientists have used a new gene-editing technique to create pigs that can keep their bodies warmer, burning more fat to produce leaner meat. Infrared pictures of 6-month-old pigs taken at zero, two, and four hours after cold exposure show that the pigs' thermoregulation was improved after insertion of the new gene. The modified pigs are on the right side of the images. Zheng et al. / PNAS hide caption

toggle caption
Zheng et al. / PNAS

CRISPR Bacon: Chinese Scientists Create Genetically Modified Low-Fat Pigs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559060166/559889678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fresh fish fillets for sale in a display case. Concerns over animal welfare have led to changes in recent years in raising livestock. But seafood has been missing from the conversation. One group aims to change that. kali9/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
kali9/Getty Images