Just Cats Veterinary Clinic Is Looking For A Cat Lady Or A Cat Man

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You're Not Even Safe From Bears In The Water

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A video went viral earlier this week showing a sea lion grabbing a Canadian girl's dress and pulling her into the water at a dock in Richmond, British Columbia. During the ordeal she received a superficial wound and is being treated for a possible bacterial infection. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR

A blue whale, the largest animal on the planet, engulfs krill off the coast of California. Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B hide caption

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Silverback Films/BBC/Proceedings of the Royal Society B

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

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International Eel Smuggling Scheme Centers On Maine

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Rodney Stotts walks across the roof of the Matthew Henson Earth Conservation Center with one of his hawks. A former drug dealer, he is now a falconer — one of only 30 African-American falconers in the U.S., he says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Washington, D.C., A Program In Which Birds And People Lift Each Other Up

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A ladybug unfolds its wings. Scientists have had trouble figuring out how ladybugs fold their wings back up — but a team in Japan found a way to see the process. University of Tokyo/PNAS hide caption

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University of Tokyo/PNAS

Why Do Journalists Love Reporting On The Everglades?

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Don't Feed Parrots Chocolate, Despite What Happens In Minecraft

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"I have been ordered to say that Lord Bigglesworth believes he was put on this earth to be decorative and be worshipped by his human slaves," writes Gina Brett of Cat People of Melbourne. Rachel Nagy/Courtesy of Cat People of Melbourne hide caption

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Rachel Nagy/Courtesy of Cat People of Melbourne

Workers prepare to release thousands of fingerling Chinook salmon into the Mare Island Strait in Vallejo, Calif., in 2014. A new report names climate change, dams and agriculture as the major threats to the prized and iconic fish, which is still the core of the state's robust fishing industry. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In what authorities call the largest raid against illegal cockfighting in United States history, 7,000 birds were seized in Val Verde, Calif., on Monday. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department/AP hide caption

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Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department/AP

An orangutan mother and her 11-month old infant in Borneo. Orangutans breast-feed offspring off and on for up to eight years. Tim Laman/Science Advances hide caption

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Tim Laman/Science Advances

Orangutan Moms Are The Primate Champs Of Breast-Feeding

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Tyrannosaurus rex jaws generated 8,000-pound bite forces and let the creature eat everything from duck-billed dinosaurs to triceratops. Scientific Reports hide caption

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Scientific Reports

Tyrannosaurus Rex's Bite Force Measured 8,000 Pounds, Scientists Say

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The alpha female of the Canyon Pack at Yellowstone National Park sustained a gunshot wound and was euthanized last month near Gardiner, Mont. Neal Herbert/Yellowstone National Park hide caption

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Neal Herbert/Yellowstone National Park

Turns out that humans aren't the only animals that contagiously yawn. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Yawning May Promote Social Bonding Even Between Dogs And Humans

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