Scientists At The Smithsonian Institution's Ant Lab Name New Species

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Cattle owned by Fulani herdsmen graze in a field outside Kaduna, northwest Nigeria in February 2017. Stefan Heunis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Heunis/AFP/Getty Images

Clashes Over Grazing Land In Nigeria Threaten Nomadic Herding

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Say what you will about naked mole-rats, but their bodies have a trick that lets them survive periods of oxygen deprivation. Roland Gockel/Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine hide caption

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Roland Gockel/Max Delbruck Center for Molecular Medicine

Researchers Find Yet Another Reason Why Naked Mole-Rats Are Just Weird

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An American black bear (they are often brown) is seen in Yosemite National Park. Rangers hope tracking the bears' locations will help prevent the animals from being hit by cars. Yosemite National Park via AP hide caption

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Yosemite National Park via AP

Yosemite Rangers Use Technology To Save Bears From Cars

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Three giraffes and a white rhino laze in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania in 2012. The global giraffe population has dropped sharply in recent decades, prompting wildlife groups to urge the giraffe's addition to the endangered species list. Barbara Hollweg/IFAW hide caption

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Barbara Hollweg/IFAW

Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord blood plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people. Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds

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Native westslope cutthroat trout swim in the north fork of the Flathead River in northwestern Montana. However, cutthroat trout populations are threatened by hybridization from mating with rainbow trout. Jonny Armstrong/USGS hide caption

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Jonny Armstrong/USGS

In The Rockies, Climate Change Spells Trouble For Cutthroat Trout

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Cat groomer Alex Perry clips the nails of a cat. Rachel Valadez/Artis Photography hide caption

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Rachel Valadez/Artis Photography

'Brave New Workers': Ex-Construction Worker Builds A New Life Grooming Cats

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Slaughter Of Yellowstone Bison At The Center Of Culture War

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Spider Scientists Find 50 New Species

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Dr. Thumbi Mwangi, an infectious disease epidemiologist from Kenya, at Howard Theatre in Washington, DC, on Nov. 29, 2016. In the U.S., Mwangi worked on a vaccine for cows that aimed to combat the same disease he saw the bovine battle in Kenya as a kid. Akash Ghai/for NPR hide caption

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Akash Ghai/for NPR

Young European eels (Anguilla anguilla) are called "glass eels" at that stage because they're transparent except for a dark spine down the middle. Philippe Garguil/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Garguil/Science Source

Eels May Use 'Magnetic Maps' As They Slither Across The Ocean

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This wounded ant (Megaponera analis), with two termites clinging to it, is alive but likely too exhausted after battle to get back to the nest without help. Frank et al./Science Advances hide caption

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Frank et al./Science Advances

No Ant Left Behind: Warrior Ants Carry Injured Comrades Home

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When it comes to biopesticides, one of the most widely used fungi is Beauveria bassiana. Above, a kudzu bug killed by Beauveria bassiana, seen growing out of the cadaver. Courtesy of Brian Lovett/University of Maryland Entomology hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Lovett/University of Maryland Entomology

Honeybees are seen inside a colony at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, Md., in 2007. Maryland lawmakers approved a bill this week permitting beekeepers to shoot black bears that threaten their hives. Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP hide caption

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Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP

The new report from leading U.S. scientists shines a spotlight on how the research enterprise as a whole creates incentives that can be detrimental to good research. Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images

Top Scientists Revamp Standards To Foster Integrity In Research

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An M-44 — also known as a "cyanide bomb" for the way it sprays sodium cyanide — sits nested between two rocks. Mark Mansfield, father of a boy accidentally sprayed March 16 in Idaho, calls these devices used to protect livestock from predators "neither safe nor humane." Bannock County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Bannock County Sheriff's Office
Sam Rowe for NPR

Drugs That Work In Mice Often Fail When Tried In People

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This is mountain lion kitten known as P-54 found in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area. It is the only known kitten from P-23's third litter, according to the National Park Service. Courtesy of the National Park Service hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Park Service

A Mountain Lion Kitten Is Found, Leading To Excitement And Concern

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An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

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