An African giant pouched rat sniffs for traces of land mine explosives at a training facility run by APOPO, a nonprofit that trains the rats to detect both tuberculosis and land mines. Not only does it have an excellent nose, but it can jump 5 feet in the air. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The South American polka dot tree frog was recently found to glow fluorescent under ultraviolet light. Julián Faivovich and Carlos Taboada (Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia"—CONICET) hide caption

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Julián Faivovich and Carlos Taboada (Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia"—CONICET)

A tardigrade, known as a water bear, is shown magnified 250 times. These tiny aquatic invertebrates can go without water for 10 years, surviving as a dessicated shell. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images

How One Of The World's Toughest Creatures Can Bring Itself Back To Life

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Mitch Seavey poses with his lead dogs Pilot, left, and Crisp under the Burled Arch after winning the 1,000-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, in Nome, Alaska, on Tuesday. Seavey won his third Iditarod, becoming the fastest and oldest champion at age 57. Diana Haecker/AP hide caption

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Diana Haecker/AP

Rocky spent his first few years raised by people, and is particularly attuned to human speech and behavior, researchers say. But his remarkable ability to learn and match human pitch and common sounds of speech surprised them. Mark Kaser/Courtesy of Indianapolis Zoo hide caption

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Mark Kaser/Courtesy of Indianapolis Zoo

Orangutan's Vocal Feats Hint At Deeper Roots of Human Speech

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Poachers Kill White Rhino In French Zoo, Saw Off Horn

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Bees Travel Cross Country For The California Almond Harvest

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White rhinoceros Gracie (left) and Bruno — seen in their enclosure at Thoiry Zoo in France on Tuesday — are safe. Poachers broke into the zoo overnight and killed a 4-year-old male white rhino named Vince. Christian Hartmann/Reuters hide caption

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Christian Hartmann/Reuters

The Case For The Golden Eagle Instead Of The Bald Eagle As The National Emblem

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Tubes of hematite, an iron-rich mineral, might be evidence of microbial life that lived around underwater vents billions of years ago. Matthew Dodd/University College London hide caption

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Matthew Dodd/University College London

Tiny Fossils Could Be Oldest Evidence Of Life On Earth

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