Asia Asia

Reuters journalist Wa Lone is escorted by police as he leaves court Wednesday outside Yangon, Myanmar. He and U Kyaw Soe Oo, who had been investigating a possible mass grave in Rakhine state, stand accused of violating the Official Secrets Act and face up to 14 years in prison. Thein Zaw/AP hide caption

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Thein Zaw/AP

In December at the Seoul Railway Station in South Korea, a man walks by a TV report about North Korea's missile launch with images of U.S. President Trump and South Korean President Moon Jae-in. On Wednesday, Trump and Moon spoke by phone and Trump expressed openness to U.S.-North Korea talks "at the appropriate time, under the right circumstances." Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

"In 70 years, Pakistan has bought transgenders to a position where they have no rights and no respect," says Ashi. "We are trying to regain our status in society." Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Pakistan's Transgender Women, Long Marginalized, Mobilize For Rights

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South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myung-gyun (left) shakes hands with North Korean chief delegate Ri Son Gwon after their meeting Tuesday at the village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone dividing the two countries. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

North And South Korea Reach Breakthroughs In First High-Level Talks In 2 Years

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Yasuhiro Suzuki of Japan reacts after competing in the Canoe Sprint Men's Kayak Single 1000m during the Guangzhou Asian Games on Nov. 25, 2010, in Guangzhou, China. Suzuki is now banned for eight years for spiking a fellow Japanese racer's drink with an anabolic steroid. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

In this image from video, Thailand's Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha (left) waves and walks off as a life-sized cardboard cut-out figure of himself is placed next to the microphone during a media conference in Bangkok on Monday. TPBS/AP hide caption

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TPBS/AP

At Korea Talks, Pyongyang Agrees To Send Athletes To Winter Olympics

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A giant North Korean flag flutters from a 528-foot pole near the border with South Korea. Tunnels built by North Korea's military are believed to extend across the border. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

As North Korea Tensions Rise, U.S. Army Trains Soldiers To Fight In Tunnels

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South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon, left, shakes hands with the head of North Korean delegation Ri Son-Gwon before their meeting at the Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone on Tuesday in Panmunjom, South Korea. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Will Sending North Korean Athletes To The Winter Olympics Change Relations?

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A 30-foot by 30-foot mock-up of the Titanic replica now under construction stands near the construction site in China's Sichuan Province. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

A Life-Size Replica Of The Titanic Is Under Construction In China's Countryside

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Local Chinese Government Backs Titanic Replica

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The Iranian oil tanker Sanchi was ablaze Sunday after a collision with a freighter off China's east coast. One crew member is dead and 31 are missing, as rescue efforts are hampered by bad weather and the fire. AP hide caption

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AP

These are some of the books from the study. From left: The Cat That Eats Letters by Ge Jing. The Foolish Old Man Who Removed The Mountain by Cai Feng. The Jar of Happiness by Aisla Burrows. from left: Shandong Education Press; Shanghai people's Fine Arts Publishing House; Child's Play International. hide caption

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from left: Shandong Education Press; Shanghai people's Fine Arts Publishing House; Child's Play International.

Demonstrators take part in a protest against U.S. aid cuts, in Lahore, Pakistan, on Friday. Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images

Pakistan Defends Anti-Terrorism Record After U.S. Cuts Aid

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