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As Flu Season Strains Hospitals, Doctor Offers Advice For How To Stay Healthy

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How Active Duty Military Are Navigating Changing Attitudes Toward Marijuana

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The Call-In: The Nursing Industry

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Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin On Requiring Medicaid Recipients To Work

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Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, at a White House press conference in May. More people moving off Medicaid, she says, would be a good outcome. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

New Rules May Make Getting And Staying On Medicaid More Difficult

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Utah Gov. On State's Proposal To Impose Medicaid Work Requirements

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Flu patient Donnie Cardenas waits in an emergency room hallway with roommate Torrey Jewett at the Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, Calif., this past week. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Flu Season Is Shaping Up To Be A Nasty One, CDC Says

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Ariel Haughton's children Rose (left), 4, and Javier, 2, are covered by CHIP. Haughton is upset that lawmakers have left CHIP in flux for her two children and millions of kids around the country. Courtesy of Ariel Haughton hide caption

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Courtesy of Ariel Haughton

Head Of Medicaid Directors On States Imposing Work Requirements For Recipients

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Noemi Padilla, 47, recently left Tampa Women's Health, an independent clinic in Tampa, Fla. She worked there as a surgical nurse and assisted on abortion procedures up to about 23 weeks gestation. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

The Anti-Abortion Group That's Urging Clinic Workers to Quit Their Jobs

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Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, led efforts to require work for Medicaid recipients while in charge of Indiana's program. She was sworn in as administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services by Vice President Pence on March 14. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Will Let States Require People To Work For Medicaid

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Proponents of medically supervised, indoor sites for opioid injection say such places would be much safer than tent encampments like this one — and could help people addicted to opioids transition into treatment and away from drug use. Natalie Piserchio for WHYY hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for WHYY

Desperate Cities Consider 'Safe Injection' Sites For Opioid Users

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Hospitals Brace Patients For Pain To Reduce Risk Of Opioid Addiction

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As flu cases mount in California, the state's health department recommends vaccination for all people 6 months and older. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Up to one half of rural residents are covered by Medicaid, says Michelle Mills, CEO of Colorado Rural Health Center. And they're typically older, poorer and sicker than city dwellers. John Daley/CPR hide caption

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John Daley/CPR

The CHIP program provides health coverage to 9 million children from lower-income households that make too much money to qualify for Medicaid. The $2.85 billion Congress allocated in December was supposed to fund CHIP programs in all states through March 31. But federal health officials say it won't stretch that far. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images