Donald Trump Jr. and Paul Manafort are negotiating what congressional testimony they have to give about their meeting with Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya, photographed earlier this month. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Former CIA Director John Brennan appears before a House hearing in May. He told a public policy conference on Friday that Trump associates should have known better than to meet with a Russian lawyer last year. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

White House press secretary Sean Spicer briefs the media in June. He announced Friday that he was stepping down from his job in the Trump administration and would continue his service through August. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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A lone bouquet of flowers stands in front of a home in Phoenix in 2013, after police said a man killed his wife, daughter and brother-in-law before killing himself. A new CDC report sheds light on patterns in homicides of women. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Canvasser Ana Mejia gathers her supplies at the offices of the National Council of La Raza in Miami in 2016. The NCLR renamed itself UnidosUS this month, causing a rift in the U.S. Latino community. Some see it as shedding a dated name, but others see it as leaving a legacy behind. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

The Largest U.S. Latino Advocacy Group Changes Its Name, Sparking Debate

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Ruins are all that remain of the 12th century Great Mosque of al-Nuri, where ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declared three years ago that an Islamic state was rising again. ISIS blew the mosque up as Iraqi forces advanced. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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The U.S. is planning to ban American citizens from traveling to North Korea, tourism companies say. Earlier this week, Korean People's Army soldiers walked past portraits of late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung (left) and Kim Jong Il at the Korean Revolutionary Museum in Pyongyang. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin leads a Cabinet meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow on Wednesday. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

In Putin's Russia, An 'Adhocracy' Marked By Ambiguity And Plausible Deniability

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions testified on Capitol Hill last month that any suggestion that he colluded with Russia to interfere in the U.S. presidential election was an "appalling and detestable lie." Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

A woman holds a sign reading "Justice for Justine" during a march Thursday in Minneapolis. Several days of demonstrations have occurred after the death of Justine Damond, who was killed late Saturday by a police officer responding to her emergency call. Stephen Maturen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Gerald Ford shakes hands with Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev on Nov. 24, 1974, in a meeting in the Soviet city of Vladivostok. Several weeks later, Ford signed a law that would place restrictions on Soviet trade with the U.S. for nearly four decades. AP hide caption

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AP

An empty coffee mug, left forlorn on the table. Federal regulators found that "New of Kopi Jantan Tradisional Natural Herbs Coffee" had an ingredient similar to the active ingredient in Viagra. Ezra Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Bailey/Getty Images