A pump jack at work in 2016, near Firestone, Colo. The American Exploration & Production Council, which represents oil and gas exploration firms, is one of many industry groups supporting the HONEST Act, which was passed by the House and is now with the Senate. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

GOP Effort To Make Environmental Science 'Transparent' Worries Scientists

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Northern elephant seals recognize each other's voices based on rhythm and pitch. Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology hide caption

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Nicolas Mathevon/Current Biology

Threat call of a northern elephant seal

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Researchers Examine When People Are More Susceptible To Fake News

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According to research from Harvard, between 10% and 40% of the kids who intend to go to college at the time of high school graduation don't actually show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon "summer melt," and it has long been a puzzling problem. S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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S_e_P_p/Getty Images/iStockphoto

An image of Penicillium colonies. The white colony is a mutant similar to the mold found in Camembert cheese. The green ones are the wild form. Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe hide caption

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Courtesy of Benjamin Wolfe

New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and endure stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Leland Bobbe/Getty Images hide caption

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Leland Bobbe/Getty Images

Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

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Quantum satellite "Micius" flies past the quantum teleportation experiment platform in Tibet. Chinese scientists have announced they successfully "teleported" information on a photon from Earth to space, spanning a distance of more than 300 miles. Jin Liwang/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Jin Liwang/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Beam Me Up, Scotty ... Sort Of. Chinese Scientists 'Teleport' Photon To Space

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With an American honeybee queen for a mother and a European honeybee drone for a father, this worker bee has a level of genetic diversity unseen in the U.S. for decades. Researchers at Washington State University hope a deeper gene pool will give a new generation of honeybees much-needed genetic traits, like resistance to varroa mites. The parasite kills a third of American honeybees each year. Megan Asche/Courtesy of Washington State University hide caption

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Megan Asche/Courtesy of Washington State University

Image of a CAR-T cell (reddish) attacking a leukemia cell (green). These CAR-T lymphocytes are used for immunotherapy against cancer (CAR stands for chimeric antigen receptor). After the proliferation of the CAR-expressing T cells, they are transfused back into the patient and can directly detect the cancer cells carrying the antigen. Eye of Science/Science Source hide caption

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Eye of Science/Science Source

'Living Drug' That Fights Cancer By Harnessing Immune System Clears Key Hurdle

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Lara Hogan developed preeclampsia when she was pregnant with her son Zion in 2016. Both are fine now, but she's taking extra precautions to stay healthy. Anna Gorman/California Healthline hide caption

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Anna Gorman/California Healthline

Women With High-Risk Pregnancies Are More Likely To Develop Heart Disease

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Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed

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Research shows birth order really does matter. Catherine Delahaye/Getty Images hide caption

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Catherine Delahaye/Getty Images

Research Shows Birth Order Really Does Matter

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The frog Hyla sanchiangensis from eastern China is a descendant of one of three lineages that made it through Earth's last mass extinction 66 million years ago to flourish worldwide today. Peng Zhang, Sun Yat-Sen University hide caption

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Peng Zhang, Sun Yat-Sen University

A double set of fences topped with barbed wire circles this outdoor decomposition site outside Grand Junction, Colo. The barrier thwarts prying eyes and protects the curious from an unpleasant surprise. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

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Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

To Solve Gruesome Desert Mysteries, Scientists Become Body Collectors

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Researchers monitored the health of these wild bees, from the species Osmia bicornis. They nest inside small cavities, such as hollow reeds. Courtesy of Centre for Ecology & Hydrology hide caption

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Courtesy of Centre for Ecology & Hydrology

Pesticides Are Harming Bees — But Not Everywhere, Major New Study Shows

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Mammography has helped increase the early detection of breast tumors. Now, researchers say, the goal is to discern which of those tumors need aggressive treatment, including chemotherapy or radiation after surgery. Chicago Tribune/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Tribune/Getty Images

Tumor Test Helps Identify Which Breast Cancers Don't Require Extra Treatment

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News Brief: Cardinal Denies Sexual Assault Charges, Travel Ban Details

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New study shows child care centers don't necessarily hire the most qualified teachers. Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury/Getty Images hide caption

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Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury/Getty Images

Child Care Centers Often Don't Hire The Most Qualified Teachers, Study Shows

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