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The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists calls the flu vaccine an "essential" part of prenatal care, for protection of the newborn as well as the woman. Infants typically don't get their own flu shot until age 6 months or later. Katherine Streeter for NPR hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Pregnant Women Should Still Get The Flu Vaccine, Doctors Advise

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Food allergies are tricky to diagnose, and many kids can outgrow them, too. A test called an oral food challenge is the gold standard to rule out an allergy. It's performed under medical supervision. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

This Test Can Determine Whether You've Outgrown A Food Allergy

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Researchers have won a prize for discovering that a cow's genetics determine which microbes populate its gut. Some of those microbes produce the greenhouse gas methane that comes out of cow belches and farts and ends up in the atmosphere. Charlie Litchfield/AP hide caption

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Charlie Litchfield/AP

A duck-billed dinosaur skeleton, which the researchers think ate crustaceans, on display in 2009 at the Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

Examining Links Between Academic Performance And Food Stamps

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Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

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University Studied How Men With Shaved Heads Are Perceived

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While benzodiazepines and SSRI antidepressants are not risk-free, says Yale psychiatrist Kimberly Yonkers, "it should be reassuring that we're not seeing a huge magnitude of an effect here" on pregnancy. Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Xanax Or Zoloft For Moms-To-Be: A New Study Assesses Safety

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Matthew Rockloff and Nancy Greer give their acceptance speech after winning the Ig Nobel Economics Prize during ceremonies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday. The pair won for their experiments to see how contact with a live crocodile affects a person's willingness to gamble. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Experiments that showed how to make the H5N1 bird flu virus more contagious raised concern about malicious misuse of laboratory research. Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Researchers set out to answer this question: Is there a safe level of alcohol consumption during pregnancy? Turns out, that's a hard question to answer. The advice remains: Don't risk it. Tim Clayton/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Clayton/Corbis/Getty Images

Is One Drink OK For Pregnant Women? Around The Globe, The Answer Is No

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A study of chemotherapy medicines produced by 10 companies found that, on average, each drug produced seven times as much revenue for its manufacturer as it cost in research and development. BrianAJackson/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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BrianAJackson/iStockphoto/Getty Images

R&D Costs For Cancer Drugs Are Likely Much Less Than Industry Claims, Study Finds

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For the first time, scientists have carefully analyzed all the critters in a kitchen sponge. There turns out to be a huge number. Despite recent news reports, there is something you can do about it. Joy Ho for NPR hide caption

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Joy Ho for NPR

So Your Kitchen Sponge Is A Bacteria Hotbed. Here's What To Do

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The blood-sucking conenose assassin bug (Triatoma sanguisuga) is also called a "kissing bug" because of its tendency to bite human faces. It feeds on human blood and is the vector of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas disease. Ray Coleman/Science Source hide caption

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Ray Coleman/Science Source

Look deeply into those soulful eyes ... but watch out for that nose. When it comes time to decide whether to leave, this African wild dog may be trying to say more to its pack with the latter. Pim Stouten/Flickr hide caption

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Pim Stouten/Flickr

Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Get Off The Couch Baby Boomers, Or You May Not Be Able To Later

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