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Rebeca Gonzalez says she can now afford to buy pomegranates for her family in Garden Grove, Calif., because of the extra money she receives through Más Fresco, a food stamp incentive program for purchasing produce. Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News

A skull discovered at a sacred Aztec temple. A new study analyzed DNA extracted from the teeth of people who died in a 16th century epidemic that destroyed the Aztec empire, and found a type of salmonella may have caused the epidemic. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Women are catching up with men nationally in overall drinking, as well as in binge drinking, drunk driving and deaths from cirrhosis of the liver caused by alcoholism. Vasyl Tretiakov / EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Vasyl Tretiakov / EyeEm/Getty Images

Study participants often answer questions differently, depending on the questioner's gender. Sex hormones can affect results, too. sanjeri/Getty Images hide caption

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A Scientist's Gender Can Skew Research Results

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A modern moth with a proboscis, the organ adapted for sucking up fluids such as nectar. Newly discovered fossil evidence suggests ancestors of such animals exists before flowering plants, raising questions about what ancient butterflies and moths used their tongue-like appendages for. Hossein Rajaei/Science Advances hide caption

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Hossein Rajaei/Science Advances

'Butterfly Tongues' Are More Ancient Than Flowers, Fossil Study Finds

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In both urban and rural areas, about 40 percent of women surveyed were currently married to a member of the opposite sex. Only about 30 percent of the rural women of childbearing age had no children, versus roughly 41 percent of urban women. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Study: Great Recession Led To Fewer Deaths

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These large capsules, which can be swallowed, measure three different gases as they traverse the gastrointestinal tract. Courtesy of Peter T. Clarke/RMIT University hide caption

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Courtesy of Peter T. Clarke/RMIT University

Controversial Social Scientist Charles Murray Retires

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Two bonobos play fight at the Lola Ya Bonobo sanctuary in Democratic Republic of Congo in 2012. Emilie Genty/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Emilie Genty/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Unlike Humans, Bonobos Shun Helpers And Befriend The Bullies

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Here's what archaeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption

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Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature

Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America

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Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli says that while a certain amount of memory loss is a natural part of aging, what Alzheimer's patients experience is different. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Neuroscientist Predicts 'Much Better Treatment' For Alzheimer's Is 10 Years Away

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Mine Cicek, an assistant professor at the Mayo Clinic, processes samples for the All of Us program. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Researchers Gather Health Data For 'All Of Us'

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Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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David Silverman/Getty Images

Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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Young bodies may more easily rebound from long bouts of sitting, with just an hour at the gym. But research suggests physical recovery from binge TV-watching gets harder in our 50s and as we get older. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

Home For The Holidays? Get Off The Couch!

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The Haunting Effects Of Going Days Without Sleep

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Why A Creatively Wrapped Gift Could Lead To Disappointment

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Gene Editing Experiments In Mice May Help People Hear Too

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Jocelyne Bloch: The Brain May Be Able To Repair Itself — With Help Courtesy of Jocelyne Bloch hide caption

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Courtesy of Jocelyne Bloch

Jocelyne Bloch: After An Injury, Can The Brain Heal Itself?

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