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Greg Miller shows the Suboxone medication in 2016 that he has taken daily for his addiction to painkillers. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post/Getty Images

More than 30,000 people a year are killed by gun violence, including 50 killed near the Los Vegas strip last month where this makeshift memorial stands. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What If We Treated Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis?

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Yaritza Martinez holds her son, Yariel, during a visit to Children's National Health System in Washington D.C. She was infected with the Zika virus while pregnant, but Yariel seems to be doing fine. Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU

A Baby Exposed To Zika Virus Is Doing Well, One Year Later

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Chris Andrews/Getty Images

With Stricter Guidelines, Do You Have High Blood Pressure Now?

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Is There A Way To Keep Using Opioid Painkillers And Reduce Risk?

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Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty Images

Brain Scientists Look Beyond Opioids To Conquer Pain

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Kim Ryu for NPR

Scientists Start To Tease Out The Subtler Ways Racism Hurts Health

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Kids who saw an ad for legal marijuana were more likely to report smoking it one year later, according to a Rand Corp. report. Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images hide caption

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A algae bloom in Lake Erie contaminated the water supply for Toledo, Ohio, in August 2014. About 400,000 people were without useable water. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, and Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., listen to debate on tax reform on Wednesday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Researchers grew sheets of genetically altered skin cells in the lab and used them to treat a boy with life-threatening epidermolysis bullosa. CMR Unimore/Nature hide caption

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CMR Unimore/Nature

Genetically Altered Skin Saves A Boy Dying Of A Rare Disease

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At a press conference in Japan on Monday, President Donald Trump blamed mental illness, not guns, for the Texas massacre. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Texas Shooter's History Raises Questions About Mental Health And Mass Murder

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Kathleen Phelps, who lacks health insurance, speaks in favor of expanding Medicaid at a news conference in Portland, Maine on Oct. 13, 2016. Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Patty Wight/Maine Public Radio

Law enforcement officials investigate the scene of a shooting at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas, earlier this week in which 26 people were killed. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

In Texas And Beyond, Mass Shootings Have Roots In Domestic Violence

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Patients with Type-1 diabetes don't have enough healthy islets of Langerhans cells — hormone-secreting cells of the pancreas. Granules inside these cells release insulin and other substances into the blood. Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source

A Quest: Insulin-Releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

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